Life Isn’t Always Sunshine And Rainbows

September 24, 2014 | No Comments » | Topics: Interesting

How Cancer Ruined My Life, an unfinished note by a child with terminal brain cancer

 

This really makes you think how badly she acted around her family to warrant this (Snopes article)

 

A Police dog sniffing the hat of his handler who was killed in the line of duty

 

A health worker disinfects a corpse in an Ebola isolation ward, once a primary school, in Monrovia, Liberia

 

As a high school student, future serial killer Jeffrey Dahmer would try to sneak into as many club yearbook pictures as possible. After a teacher found out about his prank, she smudged his face out with a permanent marker. Here, he is pictured in the top center (documentary)

 

I find it deeply heartbreaking someone is still looking for her and hoping shes alive

 

Cancer-Stricken Dad Walks 11-Year-Old Down The ‘Aisle’ Because He Won’t Be There For The Real Thing (story)

 

An image from the personal journal of Clive Wearing, a man with profound amnesia. With a memory of only seconds, he is continuously “waking up” into consciousness.

 

A message a killer left on a mirror above the apartment’s bed in the victim’s lipstick; This led to him being nicknamed “the Lipstick Killer” in the media (documentary)

 

Twin sister mourns the death of her brother lost to suicide

Sisters last words at the funeral.

“Dad asked me to prepare something. Something small, if necessary, a few words that I could fall back on if it got too difficult. I tried. I wanted to write a text, I wanted to write a great text where people would come home and think, “Wow, that twin sister of his really told us something” But not a single word comes close to how I feel right now. Indescribable. Unbelievable. Unbearable. This year in English we had our “Moment of beauty” proposals. That was a moment of pure happiness. A moment which you could look back at and made you happy. There are great stories that were told in class and then it was my turn. I thought it sounded so stupid. But my moment of beauty was when Lukas came home. The moment I could hold him and that we could tell our stories. “It sounds so stupid,” I said when I started. Actually, it is not stupid. But we find it normal that our child comes home, that our brother or sister comes home, we find that normal but we really we shouldn’t. Actually, we should all cherish every moment when our child comes home or our brother / sister or our best friend. I can not believe that Lukas isn’t coming home. I’m never going to hold him again, we’ll never laugh together anymore. Lukas was…No Lukas is my best friend. The best thing that ever happened to me. We were the perfect twins. I will stay strong, because I promised, and because I do not want mom and dad to lose a second child. I miss you so much, so much. I miss you. I miss you so much. Not a day goes by where I don’t think of you. This week I dreamt that you had cancer. in my dream I was crying and crying because I knew you would die. and then I woke up and I was relieved… for two seconds. for those two seconds in which reality does not catch up with me, those keep me going. for two seconds I forgot that you are no longer here. I love you. I love you to death.

 

A 14-year old guy from my school posted this on his blog a month before he comitted suicide

 

Man’s Best Friend….

 

This child becomes a bride tonight… 

 

Did people jump from the WTC towers on 9/11 because their rooms were on fire and they were about to be burned alive?

It was too hot.  

If you had been listening to the harrowing telephone messages left by the people who were trapped, with no way out, who made one last phone call to say goodbye — and no one answered — you would have heard them explain what they were about to do.
 
Some held hands with colleagues.  Some wrapped their arms around people they worked with, and they stepped together into the empty air.  Some went alone.  No one understood the fire.  No one understood why no one had come to save them. 
 
Their last words were unforgettable.  Their voices.  Their deep regret.  How calm some almost seemed.  One young guy left a message for his brother: I’m sorry we fought; I love you.
 
One left a message for his mother.  I love you, mom.  I’m sorry.
 
I don’t think anyone understood what was happening — a plane, an explosion, why they were left there, and could not be saved.  

Then for weeks, the recordings were played on the radio during New York City’s news coverage.
 
I had a friend who thought this public use of intimate, personal farewell messages was obscene.  I disagreed.  The tragedy of losing thousands of people so quickly in a single morning could be impersonally arms length, but for those voices.  
 
If desk phones weren’t working, they used cellphones.  The towers were built originally with helicopter landings.  Many had expected, of course, to be lifted off the roof.  There was no other way to get out.  Slowly, they began to realize it would soon be over.  They started to jump.  “I have to go,” said one, and hung up.
 
The towers hadn’t fallen yet.  No one knew that was going to happen.  This is why so many people died.

At the base, office workers from buildings on Broadway and Liberty and Chase Manhattan Plaza walked over and stood at the bottom and watched as people dropped in front of them.
 
I had a colleague named Tom whose young cousin worked in one tower.  He prayed she would appear, safe.  He walked over and stood next to a man who counted out loud each body as it hit the pavement.  26.  27.  28.  “It was so weird.”  She was never found.
 
For months, photos of the “Missing” were taped to walls by the people who loved them, all around Penn Station, on telephone poles, on the sides of buildings, lamp posts, pillars.  Every surface of New York was covered with these color xeroxes.  No one took them down.

Why did they jump?

There, on the roof, they waited as long as they could, until it was unbearably hot, and they simply could not stay there anymore.  They apologized for dying, said goodbye, and went.

Catherine Beale

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