The Daily Man-Up

July 12, 2017 | No Comments » | Topics: Man-Up

If everything is too good, you’re probably stuck not being awesome.

Don’t join an “easy” crowd. You won’t grow.

Many people are so comfortable they’re miserable.

Breaking a habit, trying something new, taking a risk, making new connections, or putting yourself in a totally new situation won’t be easy, but it’s worth it. It’s exhausting but rewarding.

Calvin Coolidge says “All growth depends upon activity. There is no development physically or intellectually without effort, and effort means work.”

Comfort can lead to self-absorption, boredom, and discontent.

You can either be comfortable and stagnate or stretch yourself — become uncomfortable — and grow. Choose the latter.

Go where the demands are high. Go where the pressure is to perform.

Dr. Elizabeth Lombardo, Psychologist and author of “Better Than Perfect, says people who regularly seek out fresh experiences tend to be more creative and emotionally resilient than those who remain stuck in routine.

“Breaking your own mold can only make you stronger and more confident to reach higher levels in your professional and personal life,” she says.

To grow, you have to embrace the discomfort. The transition will be uncomfortable and scary, but that’s the nature of the beast.

Stretch yourself. You might just like what’s possible.

Peter McWilliams once said “Comfort zones are most often expanded through discomfort.”

Discomfort is a catalyst for growth. It makes you yearn for something more. It forces you to change, stretch, and adapt.

The secret to success lies in the very thing you’re avoiding. Those things that seem to break you down and humble your spirit.

Seek out discomfort. Be deliberate about doing things that push your limits magnificently. Difficulty helps you to grow.

If you want long-term success, stop avoiding what’s hard.

If you’re truly pushing yourself to improve — in any capacity whatsoever — you are uncomfortable.

When you are challenged, you are asked to become more than you were. That means creating new perspectives, acquiring new skills and pushing boundaries.

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