A Few Facts That Might Shatter Your Perspective Of 4 Beloved Icons

October 23, 2017 | 6 Comments » | Topics: Answers, TRUTH

1. At the time of her death, Mother Teresa had opened 517 missions welcoming the poor and sick in more than 100 countries. The missions have been described as “homes for the dying” by doctors visiting several of these establishments in Calcutta. Two-thirds of the people coming to these missions hoped to a find a doctor to treat them, while the other third lay dying without receiving appropriate care. The doctors observed a significant lack of hygiene, even unfit conditions, as well as a shortage of actual care, inadequate food, and no painkillers. The problem is not a lack of money–the Foundation created by Mother Teresa has raised hundreds of millions of dollars–but rather a particular conception of suffering and death: “There is something beautiful in seeing the poor accept their lot, to suffer it like Christ’s Passion. The world gains much from their suffering,” was her reply to criticism, cites the journalist Christopher Hitchens. Nevertheless, when Mother Teresa required palliative care, she received it in a modern American hospital.

2. Mother Teresa was generous with her prayers but rather miserly with her foundation’s millions when it came to humanity’s suffering. During numerous floods in India or following the explosion of a pesticide plant in Bhopal, she offered numerous prayers and medallions of the Virgin Mary but no direct or monetary aid.

3. In 1981, Teresa flew to Haiti to accept the Legion d’Honneur from the right-wing dictator Jean-Claude Duvalier, who, after his ouster, was found to have stolen millions of dollars from the impoverished country. There she said that the Duvaliers “loved their poor”, and that “their love was reciprocated”.

4. She supported Licio Gelli’s nomination for the Nobel Prize in Literature. Gelli is known for being the head of the Propaganda Due masonic lodge, which was implicated in various murders and high-profile corruption cases in Italy, as well as having close connections with the neo-fascist Italian Social Movement and the Argentine Military Junta.

5. She was deliberately promoted by BBC journalist Malcolm Muggeridge (a fellow anti-abortionist), and her beatification was based on phony miracles. In 1969, Muggeridge made a eulogistic film of the missionary, promoting her by attributing to her the “first photographic miracle,”. Afterwards, Mother Teresa travelled throughout the world and received numerous awards, including the Nobel Peace Prize. In her acceptance speech, on the subject of Bosnian women who were raped by Serbs and now sought abortion, she said: ‘I feel the greatest destroyer of peace today is abortion, because it is a direct war, a direct killing—direct murder by the mother herself.’

 

 

 

1. There’s simply no way of disputing this: the revered icon of peace and love had a serious problem with violence against women. This has been documented all the way back to his Liverpool days, and he eventually admitted it himself later in life. His first wife Cynthia and his second, Yoko Ono, were both victims of Lennon’s brutality at one point or another, and given that most men who beat their spouses or girlfriends regularly are not particularly discriminating about the object of their violence, it’s frankly impossible that they were the only ones. It seems clear in hindsight that the gentle icon the hippies worship was actually a man with very serious psychological problems who often flew into uncontrollable fits of rage which he took out on the women in his life.

2. Without question, the greatest victim of Lennon’s character failings was his oldest son, Julian. Lennon clearly resented the young boy whose conception had forced him into a marriage he didn’t want and trapped him in a domestic routine he was too immature and narcissistic to sustain. Both Julian and his mother Cynthia have publicly stated that Lennon was alternately absent, indifferent, drug-addled, and generally unpleasant to be around during Julian’s early childhood. After he divorced Cynthia, Lennon took off with Yoko Ono and dropped out of his son’s life for years. After they reconnected, Lennon severely emotionally abused his son on several occasions, berating and screaming at him until the boy was reduced to tears. Once, Julian giggled and Lennon shouted back, “I hate the way you fucking laugh!” Julian was not yet a teenager at the time. In perhaps the saddest statement ever made about Lennon, Julian later stated that Paul McCartney was more of a father to him than his real father was.

3. John Lennon made up his own life – exaggerating, embellishing, and outright lying when it suited him to do so. Usually, he did so out of pure egomania – a desire to make himself appear better than he actually was. Everyone does this to some extent, but in Lennon’s case, he rewrote almost every major event in his life to suit his tastes. He claimed he had been a working class lad from Liverpool before the Beatles; he was actually raised in a comfortable middle-class home. He denied being married during his early years of stardom. He claimed to have met Yoko Ono at an art show and their love blossomed spontaneously; in fact, Ono had stalked him for months before he gave in to her advances. He claimed to have lost interest in the Beatles due to Paul McCartney’s tendencies toward pop music and dominant role in the group, as well as his desire to do his more avant-garde work outside the band; in fact, he had all but left the band in its last two years as the result of a serious addiction to heroin. When he emerged back into the public eye shortly before his death, he claimed that he had been spending time baking bread and being a stay-at-home dad; in fact, he had been living in a drug-induced haze most of the time. The truth in all of these cases was embarrassing, but no more than the kind of behavior many rock stars acknowledged engaging in during the ‘60s and ‘70s; Lennon compulsively lied about it anyway.

 

 

1. Gandhi was dangerously politically incompetent. He ­advised the Jews to adopt nonviolence toward the Nazis, and wrote a letter to ­Hitler starting with the words “My friend”. He also advised the Jews of Palestine to “rely on the goodwill of the Arabs”. Fortunately for their existence, the Jews ignored him.

2. As well as calling Hitler his friend, Gandhi and Mussolini got on well when they met in December 1931. Gandhi praised Mussolini’s “service to the poor, his opposition to super-urbanization, his efforts to bring about a coordination between Capital and ­Labour, his passionate love for his people.”

3. Gandhi was outstandingly racist, describing “the raw Kaffir” as someone “whose occupation is hunting and whose sole ambition is to collect a number of cattle to buy a wife, and then pass his life in indolence and ­nakedness,” and saying of white Afrikaaners, “We believe as much in the purity of races as we think they do.”

4. He was also a hypocrite on many levels. He prevented his son marrying a Muslim despite publicly promoting Muslim-Hindu unity. He denounced lawyers, railways and parliamentary politics, yet he was a professional lawyer who constantly used railways to get to meetings to argue that India ­deserved its own parliament. And although he is known for his hunger strikes, his official position was that these were “the worst form of coercion, which militates against the fundamental principles of non-violence” (in which he believed).

5. His views on nakedness and sexual chastity were also belied by his depraved behavior: when he was in his 70s he encouraged his ­17-year-old great-niece, Manu, to be naked during her “nightly cuddles” with him. After sacking several long-standing and loyal members of his 100-strong ­personal entourage who might disapprove of this part of his ‘spiritual quest’, he began sleeping naked with Manu and other young women also.

6. Despite being thought of as a peaceful man, he was vicious and callous. “There will be no tears but only joy if tomorrow I get the news that all three of you were killed,” he once told some of his workers. To a Hindu he once said, “I do not mind if each and every one of the 500 families in your area is done to death.” And he forced Manu, his niece (remember the “nightly cuddles”), to walk through a jungle known for harboring rapists—just so she could retrieve a pumice stone he liked to use on his feet. When she returned in tears, he “cackled” with laughter and said: “If some ruffian had carried you off and you had met your death courageously, my heart would have danced with joy.”

7. In 1908 he left his wife for a German man named Hermann Kallenbach. “Your portrait (the only one) stands on my mantelpiece in my bedroom,” he wrote to Kallenbach. “The mantelpiece is opposite to the bed.” Gandhi nicknamed himself “Upper House” and Kallenbach “Lower House.” The two pledged “more love, and yet more love—such love as they hope the world has not yet seen.”

 

 

1. Jobs denied paternity of his daughter Lisa for years. She and her mother ended up living on welfare. . To Jobs’ credit, however, he ultimately made the situation right — he started paying child support and reimbursed the state of California for years of back child support. 

2. Steve Jobs “eliminated all corporate philanthropy programs” at Apple when he became CEO and declined to join Bill Gates’ “Giving Pledge”

3. Jony Ive went to the trouble of finding a boutique, 5-star hotel room for Jobs to stay at in London. As soon as Jobs got to his room he called up Ive and said, “I hate my room. It’s a piece of shit, let’s go.” Jobs grabbed his things to leave, stopping at the desk to tell the clerk what he thought of the hotel.

4. When Steve had to make cutbacks at Pixar, he fired people and didn’t give any severance pay. Pamela Kerwin, an early Pixar employee, pleaded that employees at least be given two weeks notice.”Okay,” he said, “but the notice is retroactive from two weeks ago.”

5. While working at Atari, Jobs recruited Wozniak’s help to build a scaled down version of Pong. There was a big bonus involved in getting it done quickly and efficiently, and Jobs lied about how much money was involved, pocketing the majority of the money for himself. (video)

6. Daniel Kottke was one of Apple’s first employees and was even a personal friend of Jobs — the two traveled around India together in 1974. But for some reason, Jobs never set him up with stock options. Rod Holt, Apple’s Vice President of Engineering, confronted Jobs with this, saying, “Whatever you give him, I will match it.” Steve said, “Okay. I will give him zero.”

7. When MobileMe launched in the summer of 2008, it was plagued with problems. People had trouble getting their data to sync to the cloud and across their devices. The press, including the WSJ’s Apple enthusiast Walt Mossberg, slammed MobileMe as an unfinished product. To address the problem, Jobs gathered the MobileMe team in Apple’s auditorium and asked: “Can anyone tell me what MobileMe is supposed to do?” When the team gave their answers, Jobs replied, “Then why the fuck doesn’t it do that?” Jobs then fired the MobileMe boss on the spot and replaced him with Eddie Cue.

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  • verbena

    “right-wing dictator Jean-Claude Duvalier” LOLOL right-wing means conservative, you can’t have small government and be a dictator. Nice try, Libs

    • nearasfar

      You really should look up some of those words before you post.

  • anta

    of course you can, with the army forces

  • Mark Daniel Johansen

    I’m not Catholic, I don’t particularly idolize Mother Teresa, but this is a hatchet job. To say that Christopher Hitchens, an outspoken atheist who has written several books viciously attacking Christianity, says that he doesn’t like a Catholic missionary and he provides one unverifiable quote with no context proves little. I give that as much credence as I give the Ku Klux Klan’s critiques of Martin Luther King. What has Christopher Hitchens done to help the poor that gives him the right to say that Mother Teresa has not done enough?

    Similarly, who are these “doctors” criticizing her missions? What doctors? What was their agenda? What did they do to help the poor and sick that was better than what Mother Teresa did? Is there any evidence that Mother Teresa could have done more with the resources available to her but refused to for some reason? Is anyone seriously claiming that she took contributions meant for the poor to live a life of luxury? Mother Teresa certainly did not lead as comfortable a life as Christopher Hitchens.

    The last section blasts Mother Teresa for opposing abortion. If you believe that abortion is a positive good, I suppose this is a valid criticism. If you think that there might be something wrong with brutally killing innocent babies because their lives are inconvenient to you, then not so much. In any case, to say that it should “shatter my view of an icon” to learn that he or she does not agree with me about a controversial political issue is very intolerant.

  • Bob Frapples

    WTF? The post date says October 23, 2017, but these comments are from 2 years ago?

    • MightyMule

      CS is recycling it seems.