Fascinating Photos Collected From History

March 28, 2019 | No Comments » | Topics: History

WW1 French trench raider, 1915

These soldiers would sneak out of their own trenches at night, often covering themselves in burn cork to darken their uniforms and exposed skin, silently creeping towards the enemy trench so that they could slit the throats or bash in the heads of the enemy whilst they slept. They would wreak havoc throughout the enemy position, using knives and clubs to maintain minimal noise, and carrying grenades which they would throw into sleeping quarters when they left. The fear factor of that no one could sleep safe, knowing that the enemy sent men like this.

 

Women from India, Japan, and Syria who completed their education as physicians in Philadelphia, 1885

 

41 members of the Ku Klux Klan gather at a ferris wheel at Cañon City, Colorado — a stronghold of the group in that era.

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Three young farmers on their way to a dance 1914

What This Photo Doesn’t Show

 

Austro-Hungarian grenadiers, WW1, 1917-18

 

Joseph Merrick, aka The Elephant Man, c. 1889

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Men admiring the Mona Lisa, which was temporarily displayed in the Uffizi. The painting was found in Florence 2 years after having been stolen from the Louvre. 1913

 

John Quincy Adams, the earliest U.S president to have been photographed.

This daguerreotype of Adams was taken at his home in Massachusetts in 1843. This is long after he had left office, he served as the sixth president between 1825-29

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Baseball team composed mostly of child laborers from a glassmaking factory. Indiana 1908

 

Edison patents the phonograph 1878

Edison’s invention came about as spin-off from his ongoing work in telephony and telegraphy. In an effort to facilitate the repeated transmission of a single telegraph message, Edison devised a method for capturing a passage of Morse code as a sequence of indentations on a spool of paper. Reasoning that a similar feat could be accomplished for the telephone, Edison devised a system that transferred the vibrations of a diaphragm—i.e., sound—to an embossing point and then mechanically onto an impressionable medium—paraffin paper at first, and then a spinning, tin-foil wrapped cylinder as he refined his concept.

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On #ThisDayinHistory 1878, Edison patents the phonograph. Edison’s invention came about as spin-off from his ongoing work in telephony and telegraphy. In an effort to facilitate the repeated transmission of a single telegraph message, Edison devised a method for capturing a passage of Morse code as a sequence of indentations on a spool of paper. Reasoning that a similar feat could be accomplished for the telephone, Edison devised a system that transferred the vibrations of a diaphragm—i.e., sound—to an embossing point and then mechanically onto an impressionable medium—paraffin paper at first, and then a spinning, tin-foil wrapped cylinder as he refined his concept. Edison and his mechanic, John Kreusi, worked on the invention through the autumn of 1877 and quickly had a working model ready for demonstration. The December 22, 1877, issue of Scientific American reported that “Mr. Thomas A. Edison recently came into this office, placed a little machine on our desk, turned a crank, and the machine inquired as to our health, asked how we liked the phonograph, informed us that it was very well, and bid us a cordial good night.” #ThomasEdison #Edison #phonograph

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Eduard Bloch the Jewish doctor of the Hitler family who treated Hitler’s mother before her death in 1907. Hitler granted him his “everlasting gratitude” and called him “noble Jew”. He was put under special protection by the Gestapo until he could move to America in 1940.

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US intelligence images of how Hitler could have disguised himself, 1944

 

Hitler shaking like a salt shaker

Adolf Hitler prefered the use of stronger amphetamines. He utilized them for not only medical treamtent but during speeches and war as well. Methamphetamine in the form of the tablet Pervitin was distribute to Wehmacht soldiers, allowing his army to expend themselves much further than the allies. There is a new book out called “Blitzed: Drugs in the Third Reich” that details the German Reich and their war drugs.

 

“This was where our house was, the body may be that of my mother.” Chieko Ryu – Nagasaki, Japan 1945

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