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A Few Answers To Questions You Always Wondered About

March 21, 2018 | No Comments » | Topics: Answers |

How did prohibition ever gain enough popular support to become law?

1) Because of the Second Great Awakening (1790-1840) and the Third Great Awakening (1850-1900), the American people became increasingly religious (yes, that’s possible), and the religious fervor translated into a zeal to improve the society, and one of the greatest scourge these religionists see is drunkenness (and people back then drank A LOT considering how cheap hard liquor was back then). These people just eradicated slavery, and they were moving down the list of societal ills.

2) Because of the Woman’s Suffrage movement, as married women and children were one of the people most heavily affected by drunkenness (i.e. husbands drinking away all the money, spousal/child abuse under the influence, etc). Prohibition has great popular support amongst the women of America. And as women’s political rights increased, so did the power of the prohibitionists. In fact, one of the Suffragette’s main arguments was that it allowed women to escape drunken husbands.

3) The alcohol trade was heavily involved in governmental corruption scandals (in part because they tried to fight the prohibitionists), and so reform-minded progressives (who were in favor of increasing governmental regulation and oversight) increasingly allied with the prohibitionists against a common enemy.

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A Few Answers To Questions You Always Wondered About

March 14, 2018 | No Comments » | Topics: Answers |

How do prisoners get so muscular?

When I first came to prison back in 2001, I knew that I would be entering a treacherous environment.  Instinctively, I felt the Darwinistic importance of staying in shape in order to survive. I was actually looking forward to ‘hitting the weight pile’ and ‘driving iron’ in order to put on some muscular size.  However, when I finally made it to the yard, I learned that the California Department of Corrections had removed all of the weights in 1998.  Administration claims this was due to the potential of them being used as weapons.  Personally, I think it was because California’s ‘tough on crime’ policy had almost doubled the size of the prison population.  The end result being more and more muscle-bound felons being released back into society.   Whatever the reason, guys in prison could no longer get as big, except for the dedicated few who used their creative ingenuity to achieve muscular size and definition.
 
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A Few Answers To Questions You Always Wondered About

February 28, 2018 | No Comments » | Topics: Answers |

How do you appreciate abstract modern art?

For this explanation I’ll stick with painting, though it applies to art in general. There’s two main things you look at when viewing a painting. It’s “form” and its “content.” Form describes the physical stuff about a painting: color, size, what type of paint, thickness of paint, type of canvas, type of brush strokes, and so on. Content describes what the painting is depicting: a house, a person, a group of people, a particular event, a collection of objects, whatever.

We’ll look at two paintings, one “normal” painting and then an abstract one. First up is Leutze’s painting of Washington crossing the Deleware.  

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A Few Answers To Questions You Always Wondered About

February 22, 2018 | 3 Comments » | Topics: Answers |

How do mathematicians know that they’ve correctly solved a complex math equation when other equally skilled mathematicians cannot?

Here’s an analogy. Let’s say you’re trying to find the solution to a very difficult maze. Everyone might be stuck trying to find their way out, but you’re the first to find the solution. How do we know your solution is correct? You showed us the path – it’s easy to verify that the path is correct, even though finding it is hard.

It’s the same in math – finding a solution is hard, verifying it’s correct is easy.

Another example is Sudoku – it’s hard to solve, but checking whether a solution is correct is easy.

It’s true that more difficult math problems might be more difficult to validate, but it’s still easier to validate the correctness of a solution (typically a proof) than to find it in the first place.

 

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A Few Answers To Questions You Always Wondered About

January 31, 2018 | No Comments » | Topics: Answers |

 

What’s it like to get chemotherapy?

I have to admit, chemo is a real snoozefest. Literally! Let me explain. For my particular cancer, I would go into the treatment center every three weeks to receive a dose of two different types of medicine. When I arrived each time, I was led into a large room with big comfy reclining chairs with about 15 or 20 other patients who were receiving treatment. They would take my blood first to make sure all my white blood cell counts are stable. Once I got the all-clear, the nurse would put an IV in my arm (still my least favorite part of my whole cancer experience) and that would administer a hefty cocktail of pre-meds to ease my body into the hard stuff. This is a mixture of Benadryl, Ativan, and steroids to get you nice and loopy. Bye, bye, brain! Having Benadryl pumped directly into your veins is like playing a game of trying to remain coherent, which I would undoubtedly lose. But it’s a good thing because each of my chemo meds had to drip into my veins for two hours. That’s four hours of chemo fun that I would just as soon sleep through, thank you very much. All total, I was usually there for six hours but practically unconscious for about four of that.

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A Few Answers To Questions You Always Wondered About

January 24, 2018 | 4 Comments » | Topics: Answers |

 

Why don’t other countries have military bases on U.S. soil, whereas we have many U.S. bases on foreign soil?

Because a foreign country having a base in the US wouldn’t serve any purpose. The US military is sufficiently powerful that it doesn’t need other countries to have bases there to provide security and deterrence in the same way US military bases provide these things to other countries (or the US itself).

I’m British, but I think it’s funny how people see the US military very unrealistically, especially here in Britain. We don’t care to admit how much we depend on the Yanks. There are dozens of countries whose security is directly or indirectly dependent on the US military. In fact, there are countries that exist today that wouldn’t exist were it not for the US military. Kuwait, South Korea etc..

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A Few Answers To Questions You Always Wondered About

January 17, 2018 | 2 Comments » | Topics: Answers |

 

What is a typical day like in prison?

I wake up at 4:55 a.m. each and every morning. Why? Well, in part because I can, because I have the freedom to choose at what time I’m going to start my day. This is not true of every day mind you, as many things can change an individual’s schedule or routine. That said, I get up that early because, when my door most often unlocks, at about 5:15 a.m., I don’t want to be in the cell where I’ve been for the last number of hours.

I most often choose to eat plain oatmeal with peanut butter, (unless it’s Sunday when the chow hall typically serves eggs, potatoes, and toast) because in part I don’t want to experience any more of the chow hall that I reasonably have to, and because I can afford to eat oatmeal (at $1.00 per pound) and peanut butter (at $2.15 per 16 oz. container) for breakfast.

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A Few Answers To Questions You Always Wondered About

January 10, 2018 | No Comments » | Topics: Answers |

What’s it like to be a pscyhopath?

Emotionals: Flatlines. Most days are just flatlines. You go out there, and you do what interests you, and sometimes the monotony of your existence is punctuated by events. Sometimes you feel pleasant and happy, sometimes you feel angry, but your emotions are like calm ocean waves. It comes, and then it goes, invariably around the clock, and they’re just as mild and watery as waves. There are no tsunamis in our world. We do not implode. We do not explode.

Our emotional range typically lacks the highest peaks and the lowest lows, but especially not the lows.

Relationships: We don’t love, and we don’t bond, and we don’t grieve. I treasure some people, but if they fell off a really tall cliff I would ask why and (if no justice needs serving) I move on. There are psychopaths who invest in people and have inner circles. There are those who do not. I’m one of those somewhere in the middle, with an inner circle I will not kill for. Regardless, we are fiercely loyal to our people. We go to great, incomprehensible lengths for them, because we are never concerned with the question, why me?

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A Few Answers To Questions You Always Wondered About

December 27, 2017 | No Comments » | Topics: Answers |

If you trained in MMA for 4 hours a day, 5 days a week, for 1 whole year, how good would you be at holding your own in a street fight or the ring?

I actually did exactly this for one year (5 hours a day, 5 days a week) for a year with no prior experience. I mainly focused on boxing and wrestling. BJJ and Muay Thai techniques were secondary in priority. I sparred everyday and power-lifted to get strong, not big. I was 5′8 and weighed 140 pounds (like Bruce Lee) and was able to put up a fight pretty well against any guy that did not train in any martial arts. It was actually surprisingly easy to beat guys who weighed even twice as much as me *as long as they did not have any martial arts, boxing, or wrestling experience.*

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A Few Answers To Questions You Always Wondered About

December 20, 2017 | 2 Comments » | Topics: Answers |

 

What is it like to be an MIT student?

The first thing I felt upon arriving at MIT was disbelief – disbelief that I had been admitted to the school that produced Nobel laureates and unicorn founders and made some of history’s most groundbreaking scientific discoveries. MIT had tens of thousands of applicants to choose from to fill their incoming class, and they chose…me? MIT had been my dream college for years, and I used to practically worship MIT students—and now, somehow, I was one of them.

Following that was the joy of being able to connect with interesting people—in high school, few of my friends cared to have deep technical conversations, but people at MIT loved them. I never had to search for long to find a group of friends who wanted to hypothesize with me about the possibility of colonizing Mars or try to estimate the number of blades of grass in Massachusetts.

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