History

Fascinating Photos Collected From History

August 29, 2019 | No Comments » | Topics: History |

408. One of the 20,000 faces of S21. Tagged, photographed and documented at the prison they were never seen again, likely tortured, forced to sign false confessions and then executed by the Khmer Rouge for the crime of “being educated” Cambodia, 1976-1979

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Fascinating Photos Collected From History

August 1, 2019 | No Comments » | Topics: History |

Stalin in the Kremlin after a meeting about the Nazi invasion of the Soviet Union at the start of Operation Barbarossa. The photographer secretly defied orders to destroy it as it was deemed not to show Stalin in a positive light – June 22nd 1941

When the invasion happened, Stalin ran to his rural cottage and had a nervous breakdown for 3 days, being unavailable to Russian command looking for guidance/orders, and drinking himself to death. Beria and other top communists went to meet him and got him out of the cottage. He was also afraid of being deposed/assassinated at this point.

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The Last Letters Of Kamikaze Pilots

July 24, 2019 | No Comments » | Topics: History |

Kamikaze translates as “divine wind” and was the Japanese practice during World War II of sending young men in planes loaded with explosives on suicide missions. The vast majority of kamikaze pilots were under the age of 25, conscripted into the army sometimes against their will. The letters, poems, and diary entries of kamikaze pilots and other special attack force members constitute an important primary source of the feelings and opinions of these men prior to their suicide attacks. Here is a collection of letters from kamikaze pilots written just before they flew their final missions.

On January 6, 1945, Lieutenant Junior Grade Tadasu Fukino piloted a Suisei dive bomber (Allied code name of Judy) that crashed into the heavy cruiser Louisville (CA-28) in Lingayen Gulf off the coast of Luzon Island in the Philippines. The suicide attack killed 36 men and wounded 56 others.

Tadasu Fukino wrote the following last letter to his mother after he had arrived in the Philippines and before his final mission:

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Fascinating Photos Collected From History

June 6, 2019 | No Comments » | Topics: History |

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Fascinating Photos Collected From History

May 14, 2019 | No Comments » | Topics: History, Interesting |

Pinkerton Detective With Lead Gloves circa 1875

This huge, almost seven foot fall Pinkerton detective dwarfs the table he is standing next to. However, it is not his physical size that makes him a deadly adversary, but the lead gloves covering his hands. They are a variation of the “blackjack.” A seemingly light tap usually surprises the unfortunate victim with broken bones or the loss of consciousness, without hurting the wearer’s hands.

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Diary Of A German Soldier Fighting In Stalingrad

April 23, 2019 | No Comments » | Topics: History |

stalingrad ww2

In July 1942, the Germans resumed their advance into the U.S.S.R. begun the previous summer, seeking to conquer Stalingrad, a vital transportation center located on the Volga River. Germans and Russians battled with dogged ferocity over every part of the city; 99 percent of Stalingrad was reduced to rubble. A Russian counteroffensive in November trapped the German Sixth Army. Realizing that the Sixth Army, exhausted and short of weapons, ammunition, food, and medical supplies, faced annihilation, German generals pleaded in vain with Hitler to permit withdrawal before the Russians closed the ring. On February2, 1943, the remnants of the Sixth Army surrendered. More than a million people-Russian civilians and soldiers, Germans and their Italian, Hungarian, and Romanian allies-perished in the epic struggle for Stalingrad. The Russian victory was a major turning point in the war.

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Fascinating Photos Collected From History

March 28, 2019 | No Comments » | Topics: History |

WW1 French trench raider, 1915

These soldiers would sneak out of their own trenches at night, often covering themselves in burn cork to darken their uniforms and exposed skin, silently creeping towards the enemy trench so that they could slit the throats or bash in the heads of the enemy whilst they slept. They would wreak havoc throughout the enemy position, using knives and clubs to maintain minimal noise, and carrying grenades which they would throw into sleeping quarters when they left. The fear factor of that no one could sleep safe, knowing that the enemy sent men like this.

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Fascinating Photos Collected From History

March 7, 2019 | No Comments » | Topics: History, Interesting |

The wartime Prime Minister of Japan, finds him slumped semiconcious after he tried to commit suicide by shooting himself through the heart, Tokyo, September 11, 1945 . He was saved by US army doctors and later tried and convicted for war crimes and hanged In December 1948.

After Japan’s unconditional surrender in 1945, U.S. general Douglas MacArthur issued orders for the arrest of the first forty alleged war criminals, including Tōjō. Soon, Tōjō’s home in Setagaya was besieged with newsmen and photographers. Three American GIs (Corporal Paul Korol, Private First Class John Potkul, and Private First Class James Safford) and two Office of Strategic Services (O.S.S.) Officers (one of whom was John J. Wilpers, Jr.) were sent to serve the arrest warrant on Tojo.

Two American war correspondents, Hugh Bailey and Russell Braun, had previously interviewed Tojo and were also present when the attempt was made to serve the arrest warrant. Inside, a doctor named Suzuki had marked Tōjō’s chest with charcoal to indicate the location of his heart. When American military police surrounded the house on September 8, 1945, they heard a muffled shot from inside. Major Paul Kraus and a group of military police burst in, followed by George Jones, a reporter for The New York Times. Tōjō had shot himself in the chest with a pistol, but despite shooting directly through the mark, the bullets missed his heart and penetrated his stomach. Now disarmed and with blood gushing out of his chest, Tōjō began to talk, and two Japanese reporters recorded his murmured words: “I am very sorry it is taking me so long to die. The Greater East Asia War was justified and righteous. I am very sorry for the nation and all the races of the Greater Asiatic powers. I wait for the righteous judgment of history. I wished to commit suicide but sometimes that fails.”

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Fascinating Photos Collected From History

February 14, 2019 | No Comments » | Topics: History, Interesting |

Man standing on lap of colossal figure of Ramses, 1856

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Fascinating Photos Collected From History

January 24, 2019 | No Comments » | Topics: History, Interesting |

Circus strongwoman Katie Sandwina aka the Lady Hercules holding up three men 1900’s

She is said to have once defeated the famous strongman Eugene Sandow in a weightlifting contest in New York City. Katie lifted a weight of 300 pounds over her head, which Sandow only managed to lift to his chest. After this victory, she adopted the stage name “Sandwina” as a feminine derivative of Sandow.

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