Interesting

11 Dancers And Employees Explain Just How Dirty Strip Clubs Are

July 25, 2017 | 2 Comments » | Topics: Interesting |

strip club

1. I worked in strip clubs (cocktail server, bartender, waitress) for +/- 15 years, and I would claim to have “seen it all.”

The clubs that I have worked in have been quite diligent with the cleaning process. Mirrors were cleaned all the time, the bar was cleaned after-hours by a cleaning crew (secondary to us servers doing a “sweep” after the “ugly lights” come on) and the bathrooms are always cleaned throughout the evenings and of course, after hours.

That being said, the couches in the private areas are scary. As staff, we never sat on them. Customers are known to be messy and yes, there are likely to be bodily fluids being exchanged or “wiped” on the couches. Many men would go into the bathroom prior to getting a lap dance and put on a condom inside of their pants so that if they B’d an L, it would be less messy for cleanup. That certainly isn’t to say that we didn’t find our share of discarded condoms on the floor near the couches after hours. Full contact is actually illegal here, but it was never a surprise to see a girl, naked, grinding away on a customer’s lap.

The first club that I worked in had roughly 10 girls that were brought to work from a different country. They would get up onto the counters and urinate into the sinks. We never knew why. Obviously, that was more so in the staff/dancer bathrooms, not the ones intended for public. Regardless, it was disgusting to think that we staff were to wash our hands there and then handle drinks.

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The Story Of Hiroo Onoda, The Soldier For Whom WWII Didn’t End Until 1975

July 25, 2017 | No Comments » | Topics: Interesting |


Lt. Hiroo Onoda, sword in hand, walks out of the jungle on Lubang Island after a nearly 29-year guerrilla campaign. March 11, 1974.

 

On December 17, 1944, the Japanese army sent a twenty-three year old soldier named Hiroo Onoda to the Philippines to join the Sugi Brigade. He was stationed on the small island of Lubang, approximately seventy-five miles southwest of Manila in the Philippines, and his orders were to lead the Lubang Garrison in guerrilla warfare.

As Onoda was departing to begin his mission, his division commander told him, “You are absolutely forbidden to die by your own hand. It may take three years, it may take five, but whatever happens, we’ll come back for you. Until then, so long as you have one soldier, you are to continue to lead him. You may have to live on coconuts. If that’s the case, live on coconuts! Under no circumstances are you to give up your life voluntarily.” It turns out that Onoda was exceptionally good at following orders, and it would be 29 years before he finally laid down his arms and surrendered.

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A Damn Fine Collection Of Fascinating Photos And Videos

July 24, 2017 | No Comments » | Topics: Interesting |

A patient playing the guitar during his brain surgery to identify his problem areas in his brain

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Feed Your Brain With These Fascinating Facts

July 20, 2017 | No Comments » | Topics: Interesting |

A self-made millionaire Harris Rosen adopted a Florida neighborhood called Tangelo Park, cut the crime rate in half, and increased the high school graudation rate from 25% to 100% by giving everyone free daycare and all high school graduates scholarships

Rosen, 73, began his philanthropic efforts by paying for day care for parents in Tangelo Park, a community of about 3,000 people. When those children reached high school, he created a scholarship program in which he offered to pay free tuition to Florida state colleges for any students in the neighborhood.

In the two decades since starting the programs, Rosen has donated nearly $10 million, and the results have been remarkable. The high school graduation rate is now nearly 100 percent, and some property values have quadrupled. The crime rate has been cut in half, according to a study by the University of Central Florida.

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20 Maps That Accurately Describe The World We Are Living In

July 19, 2017 | 8 Comments » | Topics: Interesting |

The Highest Paid Public Employees In Each State

 

Number of Executions Since 1976

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A Few Answers To Historical Questions You Always Wondered About

July 18, 2017 | 1 Comment » | Topics: Interesting |

answers

On D-day, why didn’t the Allies just bomb the beach from the sea with ships before storming with people?

 If you haven’t read D-Day, by Stephen E Ambrose, I’d really recommend it if you’re interested. All quotations are from Chapter 14 of the book.

They bombarded the crap out of the beaches. Several veteran soldiers have said the opening naval barrage on D day was one of the loudest things they had ever heard. One of the Allied airborne troopers tells it this way. “The Barrage coming in was quite terrific. You could feel the whole ground shaking toward the coast. Soon they lifted the barrage farther inland. They sounded so big, and being poor bloody infantry, we had never been under naval fire before and these damn great shells came sailing over, such a size that you automatically ducked, even in the pillbox, as one went over, and my radio operator was standing next to me, very perturbed about his, and finally he said, ‘blimey, sir, they’re firing jeeps’”

A total of 68 destroyers participated in the bombardment of the 5 beaches. Ambrose summarizes the reason why the success didn’t work in the following way. “In short, a tremendous tonnage of shells hit the beaches and batteries. The results, for the most part, were terribly disappointing. As anyone who has visited the normandy beaches will attest, this was not because of inaccurate fire, but rather the result of German skill in fortification building… They [the batteries] took many direct hits, dozens in some cases, but even the 14-inch shells failed to penetrate. The shells made pock marks, the knocked away some concrete, they exposed the steel reinforcing rods, but they did not penetrate.” However “Many of the German gunners inside were rendered deaf or knocked out by concussion” from being inside a concrete bunker.

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A Damn Fine Collection Of Fascinating Photos And Videos

July 17, 2017 | 2 Comments » | Topics: Interesting |

Protecting their right to protest

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Fascinating Photos Collected From History

July 13, 2017 | 3 Comments » | Topics: Interesting |

Shell shocked soldier (bottom left) in a trench during the Battle of Flers-Courcelette during the Somme Offensive. 1916

Shell shocked soldier in a trench during the Battle of Flers-Courcelette during the Somme Offensive in September 1916. His eyes express the madness of the war. The soldier looks like he has gone insane from what he has seen. In that moment in time everything he’s been raised to work within, the social constructs which make up every part of his life just exploded and shattered to nothing, and he’s lying there, slumped in a trench, afraid for his life, hearing and seeing death around him, his entire psyche broken. Even more haunting when you think that people didn’t smile for the pictures back then.

The circumstances of the First World War pushed hundreds of thousands of men beyond the limits of human endurance. They faced weapons that denied any chance for heroism or courage or even military skill because the artillery weapons that caused 60 percent of all casualties were miles away from the battlefield.

The term “shell shock” was coined by the soldiers themselves. Symptoms included fatigue, tremor, confusion, nightmares and impaired sight and hearing, an inability to reason, hysterical paralysis, a dazed thousand-yard stare is also typical. It was often diagnosed when a soldier was unable to function and no obvious cause could be identified. “Simply put, after even the most obedient soldier had enough shells rain down on him, without any means of fighting back, he often lost all self-control”.

While the term shell shock is no longer used in either medical or military discourse, it has entered into popular imagination and memory, and is often identified as the signature injury of the war. Shell shock would later be called “war neurosis”. It’s similar to but not the same thing as PTSD. Like in the case of PTSD, mental stress leads to dramatic physical difficulties.

Some men suffering from shell shock were put on trial, and even executed, for military crimes including desertion and cowardice. While it was recognized that the stresses of war could cause men to break down, a lasting episode was likely to be seen as symptomatic of an underlying lack of character. For instance, in his testimony to the post-war Royal Commission examining shell-shock, Lord Gort said that shell-shock was a weakness and was not found in “good” units.

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