Interesting

A Few Answers To Questions You Always Wondered About

July 12, 2017 | 1 Comment » | Topics: Interesting |

What’s it like to have Schizophrenia?

Let me run you through a day in the life of my personal brand of schizophrenia:

7:00 am: Wake up and lay in bed for awhile. Although I live alone, I hear footsteps throughout my apartment. I start wondering whether someone broke in during the night, so I get up to check the lock. Not only is the dead bolt still latched, but the chain is also still in tact; however, the footsteps are still in the kitchen, and I have to check the door and whole apartment at least three more times be sure I’m alone.

7:30 am: I’m taking a nice hot bath, but, as the water is running, I hear a conversation happening just outside the door. I know no one is there because I’ve checked the door, but I can’t help but hear a few people debating about the use of leather vs. cloth seats in cars. I dip my head under the water and try to ignore what’s not there.

8:00 am: Is there something crawling on my leg? When I look down to inspect, there’s nothing. This will happen at least once every half hour throughout the day, so I won’t continue mentioning it.

9:00 am: I’m eating breakfast, and I taste metal when I’m eating my toast, so much so that I can’t finish my food.

(more…)

1 Comment »

A Damn Fine Collection Of Fascinating Photos And Videos

July 10, 2017 | 1 Comment » | Topics: Interesting |

Black-browed albatross by @cristinamittermeier 

(more…)

1 Comment »

Feed Your Brain With These Fascinating Facts

July 6, 2017 | 8 Comments » | Topics: Interesting |

Artic Explorer Peter Freuchen was caught in a terrible blizzard and buried under a thick layer of snow and ice. When he couldn’t claw his way out, Freuchen whittled his own frozen feces into a knife and used it to chisel his way through. (article)

Standing six feet seven inches, Freuchen was an Arctic explorer, journalist, author, and anthropologist. He participated in several Arctic journeys (including a 1000-mile dogsled trip across Greenland), starred in an Oscar-winning film, wrote more than a dozen books (novels and nonfiction, including his Famous Book of the Eskimos), had a peg leg (he lost his leg to frostbite in 1926; he amputated his gangrenous toes himself), was involved in the Danish resistance against Germany, was imprisoned and sentenced to death by the Nazis before escaping to Sweden, studied to be a doctor at university, his first wife was Inuit and his second was a Danish margarine heiress, became friends with Jean Harlow and Mae West, once escaped from a blizzard shelter by cutting his way out of it with a knife fashioned from his own faeces, and, last but certainly not least, won $64,000 on The $64,000 Question.

(more…)

8 Comments »

A Few Answers To Questions You Always Wondered About

July 5, 2017 | 7 Comments » | Topics: Interesting |

How is World War II taught in German Schools?

When you grow up here and you are still rather young, you get the sense that you (as in Germans) fucked up in the past and its a lingering feeling but you are too young to understand or make sense of it.

As in you might wave to someone with your right arm and hold it up to long and someone scolds you for it or a parent quickly tells you to lower your arm and they try to tell you why.

In short Every german Student has at least 5+ years of history that is either directly or indirectly about WW2 and it’s effects on the world we live in today.

I can only speak of my personal experience which to make this easier to understand was 4 years in the Grundschule, followed by 6 years on the Realschule and topped of by 2 years on the FOS. (currently studying but there is no real impact)

Of these 12 Years i had History lessons starting at 6th grade officially. Something you quickly learn is that the education system at least where i was, had a very heavy focus on WW2 and the DDR (google Berlin Wall if in doubt).

(more…)

7 Comments »

A Damn Fine Collection Of Fascinating Photos And Videos

July 3, 2017 | 21 Comments » | Topics: Interesting |

The Life Of A Tree

 

Methuselah – One The Oldest Tree In The World (4847 years old)

(more…)

21 Comments »

Fascinating Photos Collected From History

June 29, 2017 | No Comments » | Topics: Interesting |

Hitler declares war on the United States – December 11, 1941

 

Great story from Ken Burn’s documentary ‘The War’ about Hitler’s ambition

 

(more…)

No Comments »

Feed Your Brain With These Fascinating Facts

June 29, 2017 | No Comments » | Topics: Interesting |

Huichol Indian men tie ropes around their testicles when their wives are giving birth. When she feels a painful contraction, she tugs on the rope so her husband will share some of the pain as part of their child’s entrance into the world. (article)

(more…)

No Comments »

A Few Answers To Questions You Always Wondered About

June 28, 2017 | 6 Comments » | Topics: Interesting |

What is life like on Death Row?

Nothing in your previous life prepares you for living on death row. You’re like a head of cabbage in a garden: planted, forced to lead a static existence, every day exactly like the last and the next. Unlike the cabbage, though, your life is without purpose. You are a cipher merely holding a place, awaiting your turn in the execution chamber. Until that day comes, perpetual misery is your condition in life, and your reward for surviving today is that you get to suffer tomorrow as well.

On April 11, 1962, I was cuffed, chained, and transported to Louisiana’s death row. There were twelve other men living in the fifteen available cells. Roaches scattered as I entered Cell 9. It was about the size of the bathroom in a typical middle class American home: six feet wide by eight feet deep.

Restlessness went with living in such a small space. There was room enough only for push-ups, sit-ups, and squats, insufficient to exercise all the body’s muscles. We were allowed out of our cells and into the hallway — one at a time — for only fifteen minutes twice a week for a shower. We spent years like this, always indoors, with no sunshine.

Worse than the physical toll exacted on our bodies was the toll on our minds. Death row was bedlam — an unending chorus of flushing toilets, curses shouted across the tier by feuding inmates, petty arguments over virtually anything, and competing radios trying to out-blare one another. Most of the pandemonium on death row was a result of men being driven mad by monotony, severe emotional deprivation, and the lack of normalcy.

(more…)

6 Comments »