Interesting

Feed Your Brain With These Fascinating Facts

July 20, 2017 | No Comments » | Topics: Interesting |

A self-made millionaire Harris Rosen adopted a Florida neighborhood called Tangelo Park, cut the crime rate in half, and increased the high school graudation rate from 25% to 100% by giving everyone free daycare and all high school graduates scholarships

Rosen, 73, began his philanthropic efforts by paying for day care for parents in Tangelo Park, a community of about 3,000 people. When those children reached high school, he created a scholarship program in which he offered to pay free tuition to Florida state colleges for any students in the neighborhood.

In the two decades since starting the programs, Rosen has donated nearly $10 million, and the results have been remarkable. The high school graduation rate is now nearly 100 percent, and some property values have quadrupled. The crime rate has been cut in half, according to a study by the University of Central Florida.

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20 Maps That Accurately Describe The World We Are Living In

July 19, 2017 | 4 Comments » | Topics: Interesting |

The Highest Paid Public Employees In Each State

 

Number of Executions Since 1976

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A Few Answers To Historical Questions You Always Wondered About

July 18, 2017 | 1 Comment » | Topics: Interesting |

answers

On D-day, why didn’t the Allies just bomb the beach from the sea with ships before storming with people?

 If you haven’t read D-Day, by Stephen E Ambrose, I’d really recommend it if you’re interested. All quotations are from Chapter 14 of the book.

They bombarded the crap out of the beaches. Several veteran soldiers have said the opening naval barrage on D day was one of the loudest things they had ever heard. One of the Allied airborne troopers tells it this way. “The Barrage coming in was quite terrific. You could feel the whole ground shaking toward the coast. Soon they lifted the barrage farther inland. They sounded so big, and being poor bloody infantry, we had never been under naval fire before and these damn great shells came sailing over, such a size that you automatically ducked, even in the pillbox, as one went over, and my radio operator was standing next to me, very perturbed about his, and finally he said, ‘blimey, sir, they’re firing jeeps’”

A total of 68 destroyers participated in the bombardment of the 5 beaches. Ambrose summarizes the reason why the success didn’t work in the following way. “In short, a tremendous tonnage of shells hit the beaches and batteries. The results, for the most part, were terribly disappointing. As anyone who has visited the normandy beaches will attest, this was not because of inaccurate fire, but rather the result of German skill in fortification building… They [the batteries] took many direct hits, dozens in some cases, but even the 14-inch shells failed to penetrate. The shells made pock marks, the knocked away some concrete, they exposed the steel reinforcing rods, but they did not penetrate.” However “Many of the German gunners inside were rendered deaf or knocked out by concussion” from being inside a concrete bunker.

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A Damn Fine Collection Of Fascinating Photos And Videos

July 17, 2017 | 2 Comments » | Topics: Interesting |

Protecting their right to protest

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Fascinating Photos Collected From History

July 13, 2017 | 2 Comments » | Topics: Interesting |

Shell shocked soldier (bottom left) in a trench during the Battle of Flers-Courcelette during the Somme Offensive. 1916

Shell shocked soldier in a trench during the Battle of Flers-Courcelette during the Somme Offensive in September 1916. His eyes express the madness of the war. The soldier looks like he has gone insane from what he has seen. In that moment in time everything he’s been raised to work within, the social constructs which make up every part of his life just exploded and shattered to nothing, and he’s lying there, slumped in a trench, afraid for his life, hearing and seeing death around him, his entire psyche broken. Even more haunting when you think that people didn’t smile for the pictures back then.

The circumstances of the First World War pushed hundreds of thousands of men beyond the limits of human endurance. They faced weapons that denied any chance for heroism or courage or even military skill because the artillery weapons that caused 60 percent of all casualties were miles away from the battlefield.

The term “shell shock” was coined by the soldiers themselves. Symptoms included fatigue, tremor, confusion, nightmares and impaired sight and hearing, an inability to reason, hysterical paralysis, a dazed thousand-yard stare is also typical. It was often diagnosed when a soldier was unable to function and no obvious cause could be identified. “Simply put, after even the most obedient soldier had enough shells rain down on him, without any means of fighting back, he often lost all self-control”.

While the term shell shock is no longer used in either medical or military discourse, it has entered into popular imagination and memory, and is often identified as the signature injury of the war. Shell shock would later be called “war neurosis”. It’s similar to but not the same thing as PTSD. Like in the case of PTSD, mental stress leads to dramatic physical difficulties.

Some men suffering from shell shock were put on trial, and even executed, for military crimes including desertion and cowardice. While it was recognized that the stresses of war could cause men to break down, a lasting episode was likely to be seen as symptomatic of an underlying lack of character. For instance, in his testimony to the post-war Royal Commission examining shell-shock, Lord Gort said that shell-shock was a weakness and was not found in “good” units.

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A Few Answers To Questions You Always Wondered About

July 12, 2017 | 1 Comment » | Topics: Interesting |

What’s it like to have Schizophrenia?

Let me run you through a day in the life of my personal brand of schizophrenia:

7:00 am: Wake up and lay in bed for awhile. Although I live alone, I hear footsteps throughout my apartment. I start wondering whether someone broke in during the night, so I get up to check the lock. Not only is the dead bolt still latched, but the chain is also still in tact; however, the footsteps are still in the kitchen, and I have to check the door and whole apartment at least three more times be sure I’m alone.

7:30 am: I’m taking a nice hot bath, but, as the water is running, I hear a conversation happening just outside the door. I know no one is there because I’ve checked the door, but I can’t help but hear a few people debating about the use of leather vs. cloth seats in cars. I dip my head under the water and try to ignore what’s not there.

8:00 am: Is there something crawling on my leg? When I look down to inspect, there’s nothing. This will happen at least once every half hour throughout the day, so I won’t continue mentioning it.

9:00 am: I’m eating breakfast, and I taste metal when I’m eating my toast, so much so that I can’t finish my food.

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A Damn Fine Collection Of Fascinating Photos And Videos

July 10, 2017 | 1 Comment » | Topics: Interesting |

Black-browed albatross by @cristinamittermeier 

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Feed Your Brain With These Fascinating Facts

July 6, 2017 | 8 Comments » | Topics: Interesting |

Artic Explorer Peter Freuchen was caught in a terrible blizzard and buried under a thick layer of snow and ice. When he couldn’t claw his way out, Freuchen whittled his own frozen feces into a knife and used it to chisel his way through. (article)

Standing six feet seven inches, Freuchen was an Arctic explorer, journalist, author, and anthropologist. He participated in several Arctic journeys (including a 1000-mile dogsled trip across Greenland), starred in an Oscar-winning film, wrote more than a dozen books (novels and nonfiction, including his Famous Book of the Eskimos), had a peg leg (he lost his leg to frostbite in 1926; he amputated his gangrenous toes himself), was involved in the Danish resistance against Germany, was imprisoned and sentenced to death by the Nazis before escaping to Sweden, studied to be a doctor at university, his first wife was Inuit and his second was a Danish margarine heiress, became friends with Jean Harlow and Mae West, once escaped from a blizzard shelter by cutting his way out of it with a knife fashioned from his own faeces, and, last but certainly not least, won $64,000 on The $64,000 Question.

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